Hello folks who wonder if choosing weak passwords is a common theme across all cultures around the world,

We live in a world where the world is divided on whether calling someone thick is either taken as a compliment or a derogatory comment. But then, there are some things that we don't want to be thick anymore, despite how much "everything is beautiful the way it is" advocates claim they support. Case in point are modern day smartphones, you won't find a lot of people trying to rally a crowd to petition Apple & Samsung to make thicker smartphones and tablets.

In the world of insects, having thick legs is frowned upon since everyone in the insect world is super judgmental. Don't blame me, I blame the unrealistic standards of beauty on how the fashion industry influenced these tender, innocent insect minds. That is why every insect you see has skinny Minnie legs.

Take this example of the legs on a varied carpet beetle that often ends up in my wardrobe taking a bite from my shirts while growing up.


Or this example of a California lady beetle legs that I have held in my hand.


But then, a group of insects rebelled against these unrealistic standards of beauty influenced by fashion and decided to opt for thick legs. It wasn't just a fashion statement, having such thick hind legs helped build the muscle to allow those group of insects to jump. The grasshopper was one of those rebels.


And then, that movement spread like wildfire that all Californians are so familiar with. Among the other group of insects that decided to join this movement were Flea Beetles. But before seeing them you will detect signs of their presence.


And soon you will stumble upon a few adult flea beetles munching away on a mustard plant.


Upon a closer look you will see they have a dark, metallic appearance.


The reason they are called flea beetles is because when disturbed they will jump away like fleas as evident in the video below.


This jump is possible because of enlarged hind legs similar to the grasshopper.


And here is how the rest of the legs look compared to the juicy hind legs.



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