Hello folks who wonder if the only politically correct word for gold diggers in the future will be bitcoin miners,

What really is right and wrong? Oh gawd, here we go again with Karan's existential crisis. Buckle up.

No, really. What is right and wrong is subjective. If things don't go my way it is wrong, if it makes me happy it is right. Below are a few examples with what I think are right or wrong.

  • Easter falling on the same weekend as Coachella, that is so wrong.
  • Not tipping the emergency services that took you to the hospital because of the shallow paper cut on your hand. That is totally wrong.
  • Free unlimited refills on your soda is just the right thing to do. Because you never know when one will run low on blood sugar levels.

Which is why when people say get rid of all mites, who gets to judge if that is the right or wrong thing to do. The mites are simply making an honest buck unlike the shady practices in the stock market.

Your first run in with a mite or mites on plants would look something like this.


But at that view you would be simply scratching the surface. Mites are arachnids which means spiders are their close cousins, not other insects like ants and cockroaches. Being an arachnid member means they have 8 legs as shown below.


Stop judging its unshaved legs, will you? What we are looking at is an adult spider mite. How do you know it is an adult? Did you check if it has a voter ID? We will get to that, but first let's look at what makes these mites unique.

Spider mites are so called because just like their spider cousins, they will spin silk webs to cover the leaf to protect their eggs from predators. Think about eating a pizza and you suddenly taste a bunch of spider web in the first bite, will you continue eating? Depends, on how much you had to drink that night, huh?

Below you can see fine white silk threads that make up the web.


Now the reason why these mites are so hated by gardeners and anyone who has house plants. Spider mites will pierce plant cells and slurp up the fluids inside. Below is the mite showing its piercing mouthparts.


And here is one slurping without giving a second thought to what society thinks of its kind.


This will result in the loss of chlorophyll i.e., the magic ingredient that gives the plants their green appearance and helps absorb energy from the sun. One will see white/yellow spots where the damage has taken place on the leaf.


What makes the young mites i.e. the larva different from adults is that they do not have the red color on their bodies and unlike the adults they only have 6 legs. As they grow older, they will get another pair of legs. ("Why don't you grow a pair?" couldn't be more applicable than the case of juvenile mites.) Below is a mite larva besides an egg.


And finally, I was in the middle of writing a congratulations card to an expectant mother mite with the message "Congratulations to the glowing mom-to-be! I’ve never seen a mama radiate so much beauty and poise during her pregnancy. I am so happy for you." And before I know it, this mama mite shits out the egg and continued on her way. How rude!


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