Hello folks who wonder if a venomous bite from a male rattlesnake can be called toxic masculinity,

Do we live in a drought?

Well, that depends on where you look. 
Looking at the reservoirs in California might give you the impression that the water levels are at their lowest recorded levels. On the other hand, if you look at people's lawns, the grasses who live in that lawn don't even know what a drought means.

So, it becomes interesting when you stumble across a drinking water station with leaky plumbing.

At first, it might not look like much.


But hang around for a few more minutes and you will see this spot attracting wildlife like an ice cream van attracting kids. This California Towhee stops by to quench its thirst and rehydrate.


Looking closer and we see it as a spot that attracts the local Western Yellowjackets as well. These female Yellowjacket workers will use this water not only for quenching their thirst but will carry extra water for other colony workers who cannot leave the nest not because they want to watch the afternoon NFL game but because they are tending the larvae.


Once in the colony, they will regurgitate the water to transfer it to their nestmates.
Here is how the regurgitation looks like for the European Paper Wasp.


I know you are a hopeless romantic, but there is nothing romantic about these wasps kissing each other. It is just one sister regurgitating the drop of water for another sister wasp.


And why is the leaky plumbing such a boon for these insects you ask? If you had a pool of water like this trough, the wings of the yellowjacket wasp can get wet and then stick to their body. Thus, struggling to fly off the surface of the water and ultimately succumbing because they end up using all their energy.

"Help me! Help me! I'll die without help" it shouted as I stood there.
"I can't, if I rescue you, I won't be able to raise money for your funeral expenses on GoFundMe and fund my new iPhone instead" I replied.

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