Hello folks who think water striders are worshipped among their insect peers because they can walk on water,
Snakeflies are fascinating because they look like mini dragons of the insect world. These creatures belong to their own order called Raphidioptera since they said "If it ain't broken, don't fix it" to evolution.

They haven't changed their form since 140 million years ago. Doesn't that remind you of your one friend who still wears Bell-Bottoms in 2019.

Adults can be easily identified by their long necks which can be seen swaying as they move around.

Below is a female which can be distinguished from the males by the presence of the long ovipositor(used for laying eggs, not for stinging) extending from its abdomen.




Despite having all the qualifications of a lethal weapon able to slay the aphid population in no time, these are far from effective predators of pests in agricultural fields. The reasons for their ineffectiveness as valuable predators are their picky diets(Yes, they don't eat their carrots and broccoli), spending most of their time cleaning themselves, being weak flyers and long development stages.

Below is the snakefly walking away from the party after I start judging its outdated fashion sense.




There are two types of people in the world, one who back up their cars before a bank heist and ones who get caught.

This
Unequal Cellophane Bee parked head in and was unaware I was waiting to bump into her. (Yes, she failed the DMV test)
These bees are solitary and females are single mothers trying to raise their kids while also working under a terrible boss during her 9 - 5 job.

Their common name is derived from a substance it uses in lining its underground nests, that substance is similar to cellophane.




No comments:

Post a Comment

Did you learn something new in this post? Let us know in the comments below

Tags

acorns adventures american crow ants aphids aquatic snails arachnids argentine ants bananas bark beetles barklice barnacles bats beaver bees beetle beetles bird lice birds black-tailed deer bloodworms bristletail bugs bumblebee butterflies canada goose carpenter bees carrots centipede cockroaches coot corvids court case crawfish crayfish crow crustaceans damselflies deer diatoms dock dragonflies earwigs egrets european starlings eyes ferns fishes flea flies flowers freshwater snail frogs fundraiser fungus fungus-eating lady beetles galls geese goats goldfinch gophers grasshopper green dock beetle green heron green lacewing guest post gull harvestmen hawks herons history honeybees house sparrows insects isopods jumping bristletails jumping spiders juncos katydid kayak lacewing lady beetles land snails leaf miners leafhopper lice lichens lizards lynx spider maggots Magpie mallow marsh midges mildew millipede mites moles mosquito moths mouse spider nematodes nettles newt newts nuthatches oaks owl paper wasps parasite pelicans pigeons pill bugs plants pocket gophers pollen pollination pollinators poppy praying mantis pseudopupil pupa quail rabbits roach roadkill rove beetles salamander salmon sandpiper scat Scorpions seals seeds shorebird silverfish skunk snails social media sparrows spiders springtails squirrels starlings stilts surf scoter swallows tarantula termites thrips ticks towhees trees turkey turkey vulture turtle venom vultures warblers wasps water boatmen webspinners whales wolf spider woodpeckers Wren wrens yellow jackets youtube

Featured Post

The case of the missing grasshopper

Hello folks who wonder if crime does not pay well at least the benefits are hard to dismiss, This case is about Gregory , a band-winged Gras...